Silent Trees

Silent Trees Silent Trees Is An Enthralling Political And Personal Fiction That Gives The Reader What Shansab Calls A Glimpse Inside The Soul Of Afghanistan And The Dangers Of The Unchecked Pursuit Of Power Written In English For A Western Audience, Its Themes Are As Much About The Human Condition As They Are About Afghanistan And If Fiction Is The Best Tool To Convey Them Meaningfully To A Wide Audience, As Shansab Argues, Then The Author Has Succeeded Wonderfully Masatoshi Asaoka, Diplomatic Courier I started this book weeks agoand then life interrupted meso all my reading was put on hold for a while When I started to read it again, a few days ago, I found it slow and plodding to read, but I persisted because I thought it would take me a while to find my way back to reading againto find my momentum again But I really wasn t enjoying the early part of the book because it was slow, meticulously detailed in its descriptions, and very gloomy Then there was a point when the book suddenly exploded into political chaos and the characters worlds began collapsing like a house of cards The mood changed from gloomy to intense, stress filled, and hopeless This is not a book that offers the reader nuggets of wisdom or beauty in the face of evil.not even a glimmer of hope It is a gritty, grotesque, and horribly realistic description of life in Afghanistan I can t honestly say tha
This story had potential, but it was very poorly executed, I wouldn t recommend it. Silent Trees Power and Passion in War torn Afghanistan, by Nasir Shansab, is a haunting story of a country on the verge of chaotic collapse Most of the book is set in the late 70s, before the Soviet Invasion It is told from the viewpoint of several major players, most notably the businessman Habib Dhil.Despite assurances from American acquaintances that things are stable in his home country of Afghanistan, Dhil has the intuition that this is not the case, and that the fragile stack of cards that is a corrupt government is about to come crashing down.Other viewpoints include Maggie Reed, an American lover of Dhil s, Miriam, another lover, and two of Dhil s friends, Anwar Haq and Alam Gol Each is connected to the other, and we hear each perspective of this interwoven story I was very quickly drawn into the lives of these characters There were no heroes among these them They were average, everyday people trying to survive in harsh circumstances Some of them did some pretty horrible things, yet I still found myself hoping for the very best for each of them.The writing is mostly prose, poetic and flowing It
In compliance with FTC guidelines, I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads.When I received my hardcover copy in the mail about a week before I started reading, I had a feeling it would prove to be a quick read and I was accurate in my guess Considering our long running war in Afghanistan, this novel accurately conveys a country marked by tragedy Considering the paucity of impressive literature about or emerging from this nation sandwiched between Iran and Pakistan, it was nice to see a native s perspective Throughout the book, one can catch glimpses of the author s impressions of his homeland and for that alone the book would be worth its purchase price Although people today view Afghanistan as a country that has never advanced beyond the Stone Age, there was a time when the extreme adventurers would travel into the hinterland much like Nepal and when Kabul could pride itself on being a bus
A strange book I received it as a First Reads win thank you At first I was a bit put off by some very awkward writing in the first 100 or so pages, but I did get swept into the okay, what is going to happen next mind set as the author spun out the parallel stories of his protagonists.I had wanted to read it because I was very intrigued at the thought of an Afghanistan set novel by someone who had, perforce, been steeped in the history and struggles and culture of that country.ButI don t know not one of the characters was admirable it was a book of nightmares with only a glimmer of hope and the reprieve of the nostalgia of a boyhood of freedom and horses Or, boyhoods of freedom and horses We have corruption, rather off hand sexuality women exist to be f cked or to watch their families die, or, as in the introductory scene, to lie with their nipples hardened by the presence of a ghost Or maybe the wind We have life choices with no good outcomes ever We have relent