Fountains in the Sand

Fountains in the Sand The Proposition Tempted Me It Is Not Every Day That One Is Invited In Such Gentlemanly Fashion To Wallow On All Fours With Young Arabs The Traveller Temple Was Struck, At Nefta, With The Beauty Of Its Desart Nymphs, Whose Eyes Are All Fire And Brilliancy, And He Might Have Said The Same Of The Boys As The Above Quotations From Norman Douglas S Fountains In The Sand Attest, One Need Not Strain One S Eyes Too Much Reading Between The Lines To Find The Homoerotic In His Travel Writing An Austrian Born Scott, Douglas Spent Much Of His Adult Life Traveling The World Partially To See It And Partially To Escape The Law In Whatever Country He Recently Had Departed.Although He Married His Cousin In 1898 And Fathered Two Sons The Marriage Later Ended In Divorce , The Year Before That Marriage He Was Having An Affair Not Only With A Mistress But Also Her Fifteen Year Old Brother In 1916, Douglas Fled England To, In His Own Words, Avoid Persecution For Kissing A Boy And Giving Him Some Cakes And A Shilling The Sixteen Year Old Boy In Question Described The Matter Less Innocently To Police, Leading Douglas To Be Charged With Indecent Assault Douglas Settled In Capri His Book Of Travel Together, Published In 1923, Finds Him Traveling With A Companion He Refers To As Mr R, Who In Fact Was A Fifteen Year Old Italian Boy Who Went By The Name Of Ren.Douglas Was Admired By E.M Forster And Lytton Strachey The Thrill That Only You Can Give Goes Down My Back, Strachey Wrote To Him After Reading Together , And Recently By Paul Fussell, Who Likens Him To Nabokov D.H Lawrence Was Fascinated With Douglas Enough To Base The Character James Argyle On Him In Aaron S Rod Indeed, Lawrence Uses Argyle To Make One Of His Profound Statements On Love Between Men, The Same Sort Of Statement Found In The Final Pages Of Women In Love Addressing The Marchesse, Argyle Says, A Man Is Drawn Or Driven Driven, I Ve Found It Ah, My Dear Fellow, What Is Life But A Search For A Friend That Sums It Up The Marchesse Smiles And Adds, Or A Lover, To Which Argyle Rejoins, Same Thing, Same Thing An Even Intriguing Characterization Of Douglas Is Found In Roger Williams S Lunch With Elizabeth David The Book Is Written From The Point Of View Of Twelve Year Old Eric Wolton, A Working Class Boy Douglas Took With Him Through Calabria In Julie Gray S Review Of The Book For The New York Times 13 Aug 2000 , She Writes, The Question At The Novel S Center Concerns Douglas Is He, As One Character Puts It, A Monster, The Pedophile Of The Century, Or Is He, As Eric Says, A Great Man Who Had Led Him Into A Warm And Sensuous World Of Adventures And Light Eric, No Doubt, Would Insist He Should Have The Final Word.As For Douglas, His Final Words, After Intentionally Taking An Overdose Of Pills To End A Prolonged Illness, Are Reported To Have Been Get Those Fucking Nuns Away From Me. Superb The kind of people who read old books looking for ways to be offended by the antiquated, un politically correct attitudes of those books authors best stick to the current We Are the World sort of timid, flavorless, conformist literature cluttering the groaning shelves of modern book stores, in which they can be consoled ad nauseum by opinions they can relate to If one is, on the other hand, in search of glorious English prose note how Douglas devotes several chapters to Gafsa, a Superb The kind of
I don t think Douglas was too keen on your average Arab Indolent and impulse led, he constantly noted their inability to improve their condition of life, from water supply to cleanliness to sartorial practicality the mummifying burnouse is considered thethe epitome of Arab inefficiencyTheir slovenly attitude he attributed to the notion of Mektoub, religious fatalism In returnthey regard our men of fixed principles as weaklings and cowards, who stiffen themselves by artificial rules beca I don t think Douglas was too keen on your average Arab Indolent and impulse led, he constantly noted their inability to improve their condition of life, from water supply to cleanliness to sartorial practicality the mummifying burnouse is considered thethe epitome of Arab inefficiencyTheir slovenly attitude he attributed to the notion of Mektoub, religious fatalism In returnthey regard our men of fixed principles as weaklings and cowards, who stiffen themselves by artificial rules because they cannot trust their judgements to deal with events as they arise the Arab regards terrestrial life as a chain of accidents cowards and infidels, trying to forestall by human device
2.5 stars Norman Douglas traveled to Tunisia to visit the oases of the Sahara in Southern Tunisia I am giving this book 2 stars because Douglas has obvious contempt for the locals and blames the existence of the Sahara desert on Islam There is nothing like systematic misgovernment for degrading mankind He rails against the lack of intellectual and literary pursuits He obviously has never read some of the most beautiful literature in the world that comes from the Middle East He spent so m 2.5 stars Norman Douglas t
I would be tempted to call this an anti travel book to Tunisia, in that I can t imagine that anyone would ever want to visit Tunisia after reading it True, it was published exactly a century ago, but I doubt the country has improved all that much since then.Douglas offers some lovely descriptions of scenery here and there, but for the most part, the country sounds hellish He reserves most of his scorn for the natives, whom he characterizes as uniformly filthy, ignorant, backward, superstitious I would be tempted to call this an anti travel book to Tunisia, in that I can t imagine that anyone would ever want to visit Tunisia after reading it True, it was published exactly a century ago, but I doubt the country has improved all that much since then.Douglas offers some lovely descriptions of scenery here and there, but for the most part, the country sounds hellish He reserves most of his scorn for the natives, whom he characterizes as uniformly filthy, ignorant, backward, superstitious, dishonest, lazy, and utterly incapable of learning anything or improving themselves He blames the problems of Tunisia, and indeed of all the countries of North Africa, on Islam.This is not a book for the politically correct, or anyone else who likes to pretend to be easily offended, but it is an e
I was surprised how much I liked this considering I had never heard of it or the author until I came across this new edition on a publisher s website I liked the description of the story and decided to take a chance on it Glad I did I suppose I can call it under rated since it doesn t app
Norman Douglas was a racist old prick, who writes, for instance, about the necessity of beating Arab women into submission and the virtues of buying and selling them for a profit Also, for travel literature, this is rather boring He writesabout the history of places than about his ac
the anachronistic racist comments were part of what made this book interesting an insight into a distasteful colonial mentality After looking over Douglas work, I ve concluded he doesn t like to tell you what he saw Instead, he tells you what he thought about what he saw, and frankly, his observations are rather boring. Very interesting in parts, but many of the references are so outdated and obscure that the reading became a chore even with ready access to Google search.

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  • Paperback
  • 136 pages
  • Fountains in the Sand
  • Norman Douglas
  • English
  • 22 October 2017
  • 1502560119